Head Injury in the United Kingdom

@article{Kay2001HeadII,
  title={Head Injury in the United Kingdom},
  author={Andrew D Kay and Graham M. Teasdale},
  journal={World Journal of Surgery},
  year={2001},
  volume={25},
  pages={1210-1220}
}
This paper reviews aspects of head injury management and research in the United Kingdom (UK). We discuss evidence about the scale and etiology of head injury in Britain and how this information has supported a triage-based approach, incorporating risk analysis. A Cohesive organization based upon nationally accepted, yet regionally flexible head injury management guidelines is important. Research in the United Kingdom has clarified the effect of head injury on the brain and how this can be… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Risk of significant traumatic brain injury in adults with minor head injury taking direct oral anticoagulants: a cohort study and updated meta-analysis
TLDR
The risk of adverse outcome following mild head injury in patients taking direct oral anticoagulants appears low, and these findings would support shared patient-clinician decision making, rather than routine imaging, following minor head injury while taking DOACs.
The geometry of brain contusion: relationship between site of contusion and direction of injury
TLDR
The location of scalp injuries was used as a surrogate for the direction of the blow to the head and the location of brain contusion after HI, and most contusions were contracoup affecting the frontal and temporal lobes.
Critical decision making in severe head injury management
TLDR
This article attempts to provide an up-to-date review of the published recommendations that could help health professionals in their management of SHI.
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TLDR
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