Head, face and neck injury in youth rugby: incidence and risk factors

@article{McIntosh2008HeadFA,
  title={Head, face and neck injury in youth rugby: incidence and risk factors},
  author={Andrew Stuart McIntosh and Paul McCrory and Caroline F. Finch and Rory Wolfe},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={44},
  pages={188 - 193}
}
Objectives In this study, the incidence of head, neck and facial injuries in youth rugby was determined, and the associated risk factors were assessed. Design Data were extracted from a cluster randomised controlled trial of headgear with the football teams as the unit of randomisation. No effect was observed for headgear use on injury rates, and the data were pooled. Setting General school and club-based community competitive youth rugby in the 2002 and 2003 seasons. Participants Young male… 
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