Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Nutrient sources, composition, and consequences

@article{Anderson2002HarmfulAB,
  title={Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Nutrient sources, composition, and consequences},
  author={Donald M Anderson and Patricia M. Glibert and Joann M. Burkholder},
  journal={Estuaries},
  year={2002},
  volume={25},
  pages={704-726}
}
Although algal blooms, including those considered toxic or harmful, can be natural phenomena, the nature of the global problem of harmful algal blooms (HABs) has expanded both in extent and its public perception over the last several decades. Of concern, especially for resource managers, is the potential relationship between HABs and the accelerated eutrophication of coastal waters from human activities. We address current insights into the relationships between HABs and eutrophication… Expand

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