Hardwood Tree Genomics: Unlocking Woody Plant Biology

@article{Tuskan2018HardwoodTG,
  title={Hardwood Tree Genomics: Unlocking Woody Plant Biology},
  author={Gerald A. Tuskan and Andrew T. Groover and Jeremy Schmutz and Stephen P. DiFazio and Alexander Andrew Myburg and Dario Grattapaglia and Lawrence B. Smart and Tongming Yin and Jean‐Marc Aury and Antoine Kremer and Thibault Leroy and Gr{\'e}goire Le Provost and Christophe Plomion and John E. Carlson and Jennifer J. Randall and Jared W. Westbrook and Jane Grimwood and Wellington Muchero and Daniel A. Jacobson and Joshua K. Michener},
  journal={Frontiers in Plant Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={9}
}
Woody perennial angiosperms (i.e., hardwood trees) are polyphyletic in origin and occur in most angiosperm orders. Despite their independent origins, hardwoods have shared physiological, anatomical, and life history traits distinct from their herbaceous relatives. New high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have provided access to numerous woody plant genomes beyond the early reference genomes of Populus and Eucalyptus, references that now include willow and oak, with pecan and chestnut soon… 
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