Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A

@article{Grebenev2012HardXrayEL,
  title={Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A},
  author={Sergei A. Grebenev and Alexander A. Lutovinov and Sergey S. Tsygankov and C. Winkler},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012},
  volume={490},
  pages={373-375}
}
It is assumed that the radioactive decay of 44Ti powers the infrared, optical and ultraviolet emission of supernova remnants after the complete decay of 56Co and 57Co (the isotopes that dominated the energy balance during the first three to four years after the explosion) until the beginning of active interaction of the ejecta with the surrounding matter. Simulations show that the initial mass of 44Ti synthesized in core-collapse supernovae is (0.02–2.5) × 10−4 solar masses (). Hard X-rays and… 

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Nearly 400 years have passed since a supernova was last observed directly in the Milky Way (by Kepler, in 1604). Numerous Galactic supernovae are expected to have occurred since then, but only one
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