Happiness and Childbearing Across Europe

@article{Aassve2012HappinessAC,
  title={Happiness and Childbearing Across Europe},
  author={Arnstein Aassve and Alice Goisis and Mariano Sironi},
  journal={Social Indicators Research},
  year={2012},
  volume={108},
  pages={65-86}
}
Using happiness as a well-being measure and comparative data from the European social survey we focus in this paper on the link between happiness and childbearing across European countries. The analysis motivates from the recent lows in fertility in many European countries and that economic wellbeing measures are problematic when considering childbearing. We find significant country differences, though the direct association between happiness and childbearing is modest. However, partnership… 

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