Happily Ever After? Cohabitation, Marriage, Divorce, and Happiness in Germany

@article{Zimmermann2006HappilyEA,
  title={Happily Ever After? Cohabitation, Marriage, Divorce, and Happiness in Germany},
  author={Anke C. Zimmermann and R. Easterlin},
  journal={Population and Development Review},
  year={2006},
  volume={32},
  pages={511-528}
}
  • Anke C. Zimmermann, R. Easterlin
  • Published 2006
  • Economics
  • Population and Development Review
  • In Germany the life satisfaction of those in first marriages traces the following average course. Starting from a baseline of life satisfaction in noncohabiting years one or more years prior to marriage, those who cohabit prior to marriage have an increase in life satisfaction significantly above the baseline. In the year of marriage and that immediately following, the life satisfaction of those in first marriages, prior cohabitors and noncohabitors combined, increases to a value even further… CONTINUE READING
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