Handedness in the echolocating Schreiber's Long-Fingered Bat (Miniopterus schreibersii)

@article{Zucca2010HandednessIT,
  title={Handedness in the echolocating Schreiber's Long-Fingered Bat (Miniopterus schreibersii)},
  author={P. Zucca and A. Palladini and Luigi Baciadonna and D. Scaravelli},
  journal={Behavioural Processes},
  year={2010},
  volume={84},
  pages={693-695}
}
Bats, in terms of variety of species and their absolute numbers, are the most successful mammals on earth. The anatomical and functional peculiarities of Microchiroptera are not confined only to the auditory system; the wings (hands) of bats are unique both from an anatomical point of view as from a sensorial one. They are much thinner than those of birds and their bony structure is much more similar to a primate hand than to the forelimb of other mammals of the bat's size; the thumb, is very… Expand
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