Handbook of Human Symbolic Evolution

@article{Lock1998HandbookOH,
  title={Handbook of Human Symbolic Evolution},
  author={Andy Lock and Charles R. Peters},
  journal={Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute},
  year={1998},
  volume={4},
  pages={566}
}
  • A. Lock, C. R. Peters
  • Published 1 September 1998
  • Art
  • Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
Part I: Palaeoanthropology.1. Photogallery of Fossil Skulls.2. An Outline of Human Phylogeny. (Bernard Campbell)3. Evolutionary Trees of Apes and Humans From DNA Sequences. (Peter J. Waddell and David Penny)4. Evolution of The Human Brain. (Ralph Holloway)5. Evolution of The Hand and Bipedality. (Mary Marzke)Part II: Social and Socio-Cultural Systems.6. Primate Communication, Lies, and Ideas. (Alison Jolly)7. Social Relations, Human Ecology, and The Evolution of Culture: An Exploration of… 

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