Hand size influences optimal grip span in women but not in men.

@article{RuizRuiz2002HandSI,
  title={Hand size influences optimal grip span in women but not in men.},
  author={Jonathan Ruiz-Ruiz and Jos{\'e} Luis Mesa Mesa and {\'A}ngel Guti{\'e}rrez and Manuel J. Castillo},
  journal={The Journal of hand surgery},
  year={2002},
  volume={27 5},
  pages={
          897-901
        }
}
This study investigates which position (grip span) on the standard grip dynamometer results in maximum grip strength. Our null hypotheses included (1) no optimal grip span exists for measuring grip strength and (2) optimal grip span is unrelated to hand size. We also intended to derive a simple mathematical algorithm to adapt grip span to hand size. Seventy healthy subjects (40 women/30 men; mean age, 40 years; range; 20-80 years) free of upper-limb lesions were evaluated. Each hand was… 

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