Haloperidol in palliative care

@article{VellaBrincat2004HaloperidolIP,
  title={Haloperidol in palliative care},
  author={Jane W.A. Vella-Brincat and A D Sandy Macleod},
  journal={Palliative Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={18},
  pages={195 - 201}
}
Haloperidol is one of 20 ‘essential’ medications in palliative care. Its use is widespread in palliative care patients. The pharmacology of haloperidol is complex and the extent and severity of some of its adverse effects, particularly extrapyramidal adverse effects (EPS), may be related to the route of administration. Indications for the use of haloperidol in palliative care are nausea and vomiting and delirium. Adverse effects include EPS and QT prolongation. Sedation is not a common adverse… 

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TLDR
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