Halogenated Flame Retardants: Do the Fire Safety Benefits Justify the Risks?

@article{Shaw2010HalogenatedFR,
  title={Halogenated Flame Retardants: Do the Fire Safety Benefits Justify the Risks?},
  author={Susan D. Shaw},
  journal={Reviews on Environmental Health},
  year={2010},
  volume={25},
  pages={261 - 306}
}
  • S. Shaw
  • Published 1 October 2010
  • Medicine
  • Reviews on Environmental Health
Since the 1970s, an increasing number of regulations have expanded the use of brominated and chlorinated flame retardants. Many of these chemicals are now recognized as global contaminants and are associated with adverse health effects in animals and humans, including endocrine and thyroid disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, cancer, and adverse effects on fetal and child development and neurologic function. Some flame retardants such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have… 
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