Halley and the London Queen Anne Churches

@article{Ali2005HalleyAT,
  title={Halley and the London Queen Anne Churches},
  author={J. Ali and Peter Cunich},
  journal={Astronomy & Geophysics},
  year={2005},
  volume={46}
}
London churches makes them the first buildings planned using modern scientific techniques, argue Jason R Ali and Peter Cunich. Although Edmond Halley (1656–1742, figure 1) is most famous for the comet that bears his name, he made substantial and lasting contributions across a vast range of the sciences (Hughes 1990, figure 2) during a publication career that spanned 61 years (Malin 1993, Cook 1998). In the 18th and 19th centuries he was considered second only to Newton (Sir David Brewster in… Expand

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