Hair cell regeneration in the bird cochlea following noise damage or ototoxic drug damage

@article{Cotanche2004HairCR,
  title={Hair cell regeneration in the bird cochlea following noise damage or ototoxic drug damage},
  author={Douglas A. Cotanche and Kenneth H. Lee and Jennifer S Stone and Daniel Picard},
  journal={Anatomy and Embryology},
  year={2004},
  volume={189},
  pages={1-18}
}
Hair cells are sensory cells that transduce motion into neural signals. In the cochlea, they are used to detect sound waves in the environment and turn them into auditory signals that can be processed in the brain. Hair cells in the cochlea of birds and mammals were thought to be produced only during embryogenesis and, once made, they were expected to last throughout the lifetime of the animal. Thus, any loss of hair cells due to trauma or disease was thought to lead to permanent impairment of… Expand
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