Hadza meat sharing.

@article{Hawkes2001HadzaMS,
  title={Hadza meat sharing.},
  author={Kristen Hawkes and James F. O'connell and Nicholas G. Blurton Jones},
  journal={Evolution and human behavior : official journal of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society},
  year={2001},
  volume={22 2},
  pages={
          113-142
        }
}
In most human foraging societies, the meat of large animals is widely shared. Many assume that people follow this practice because it helps to reduce the risk inherent in big game hunting. In principle, a hunter can offset the chance of many hungry days by exchanging some of the meat earned from a successful strike for shares in future kills made by other hunters. If hunting and its associated risks of failure have great antiquity, then meat sharing might have been the evolutionary foundation… 

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