Hacking the Neighbor’s Home: How Secure are Proprietary Wireless Home Automation Protocols? A Study of the Sub-GHz Spectrum

  • Jeroen Vollenbrock
  • Published 2016

Abstract

The market for new home automation products has grown significantly over the past years and continues to introduce new smart home products into our daily lives. When the wrong people manage to take control of these devices, it could have far-reaching consequences. For example, door locks can no longer actually lock the doors and cease to properly execute their tasks. Therefore, home automation devices must use secure communication protocols. However, this may not always be the case when a product is designed for mass production and low manufacturing costs. This paper proposes a taxonomy, and presents radio frequency measurements and communication analysis in order to test 32 devices for possible vulnerabilities. The results are shocking; every analyzed device is vulnerable to at least one attack that compromises the device’s communication security and makes the device vulnerable to misuse. Additionally, at least 12% of the analyzed devices that claim to use encrypted communication only use trivial obfuscation methods.

4 Figures and Tables

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Vollenbrock2016HackingTN, title={Hacking the Neighbor’s Home: How Secure are Proprietary Wireless Home Automation Protocols? A Study of the Sub-GHz Spectrum}, author={Jeroen Vollenbrock}, year={2016} }