Habituation and development of response specificity to a sign stimulus: male preference for female courtship posture in stickleback

@article{Rowland2000HabituationAD,
  title={Habituation and development of response specificity to a sign stimulus: male preference for female courtship posture in stickleback},
  author={W. Rowland},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2000},
  volume={60},
  pages={63-68}
}
  • W. Rowland
  • Published 2000
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Animal Behaviour
I examined biased patterns of habituation that occur when reproductive male three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, respond to a choice of two dummy females, one displaying the head-up posture of a sexually receptive female and an otherwise identical dummy lacking this sign stimulus (i.e. a dummy in a 'neutral' horizontal posture). Males initially courted both dummies about equally, but within 5 min, their courtship to the horizontal dummy began to habituate and was eventually… Expand
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Male threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus , from a marine population on Long Island, New York were presented simultaneously with two dummies, one simulating a normally distended ('thinner')Expand
Form and Function of Habituation and Sensitization of Male Courtship in the Three-Spined Stickleback (Gasterosteus Aculeatus L.)
TLDR
This study demonstrates that habituation and sensitization do influence the behavioral decrement and reinstatement respectively of male courtship of a female model, and it may be that the stickleback uses habituation as one means of curtailing courtship towards unresponsive females, thus conserving energy and permitting redeployment of attention to other, possibly more responsive, females. Expand
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