Habitat preferences influencing populations, distribution and conservation of the endangered saproxylic beetle Cucujus cinnaberinus (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) at the landscape level

@article{Hork2010HabitatPI,
  title={Habitat preferences influencing populations, distribution and conservation of the endangered saproxylic beetle Cucujus cinnaberinus (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) at the landscape level},
  author={Jakub Hor{\'a}k and Eva V{\'a}vrov{\'a} and Karel Chobot},
  journal={European Journal of Endocrinology},
  year={2010},
  volume={107},
  pages={81-88}
}
Cucujus cinnaberinus (Scopoli, 1763) is a saproxylic beetle listed in the IUCN Red List and the European Habitats Direc- tive. Although the species is highly protected and often red-listed little is known about its ecological requirements and status of its populations. Therefore, our main aims were to review its current and historical distributions and status of C. cinnaberinus popula- tions in Europe and to determine its recent habitat preferences at the landscape level in the Czech Republic… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Phenology and notes on the behaviour of Cucujus cinnaberinus: points for understanding the conservation of the saproxylic beetle
TLDR
A summary of the phenology and notes on the behaviour of a species of beetle that should be the focus of conservation biology is presented, which is often red- listed, and comparisons of published data within its whole area of distribution are used. Expand
Dead Wood Complexity Shapes the Pattern of the Occurrence of Threatened Saproxylic Beetle Cucujus cinnaberinus
TLDR
It is found that potential sun exposure, bark thickness, dead wood moisture and the hardness of dead wood have a significant effect on the C. cinnaberinus microhabitat selection in managed forests. Expand
Habitat requirements of the violet click beetle (Limoniscus violaceus), an endangered umbrella species of basal hollow trees
TLDR
The results provide non‐specialists with helpful habitat features of an umbrella species which is hard to detect and will increase the ability of conservation managers to identify sites that deserve protection and better monitor the habitat of many saproxylic species associated with basal hollow trees. Expand
Large-scale habitat model reveals a key role of large trees and protected areas in the metapopulation survival of the saproxylic specialist Cucujus cinnaberinus
Deforestation for agricultural purposes and logging over centuries has resulted in a significant loss of forest cover and the deep structural and functional simplification of persistent EuropeanExpand
Beetles “in red”: are the endangered flat bark beetles Cucujus cinnaberinus and C. haematodes chemically protected? (Coleoptera: Cucujidae)
TLDR
The aim was to investigate the presence of chemicals potentially involved in defence by pathogens and lay the foundation for understanding the role of their bright red colour, to study the cuticular chemical profiles of these two beetles for the first time. Expand
Identification of Larvae of Endangered Cucujus cinnaberinus and C. haematodes (Coleoptera: Cucujidae)
TLDR
Morphology of the larvae of two rare European species of the genus Cucujus (cinnaberinus and haematodes) is compared and differences are pointed out which allow the two species to be properly distinguished and which have been omitted or misinterpreted in literature. Expand
The species richness of click beetles in ancient pasture woodland benefits from a high level of sun exposure
TLDR
The results showed that the species richness of one of the most ecologically diverse beetle families, click beetles, benefits from a high level of sun exposure, and the long spatial and temporal continuity of sun-exposed veteran trees could be a good predictor for sustainable forest management. Expand
Ecologically similar saproxylic beetles depend on diversified deadwood resources: From habitat requirements to management implications
Abstract Organisms dependent on dead wood (i.e., saproxylic) are some of the most threatened by changes in the forest environment. Aside from anthropogenic disturbances resulting in forestExpand
Cucujus cinnaberinus (Scopoli, 1763) at its terra typica in Slovenia: historical overview, distribution patterns and habitat selection
The saproxylic beetle, Cucujus cinnaberinus, has received increasing research attention in Europe since the adoption of the Habitats Directive and establishment of the Natura 2000 network. TheExpand
Effects of Environmental Traits and Landscape Management on the Biodiversity of Saproxylic Beetles in Mediterranean Oak Forests
This study assesses the effects of environmental traits and landscape management on the biodiversity of saproxylic beetles from “dehesas” located in Sierra Morena Mountains (Cordoba, Southern IberianExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 89 REFERENCES
Habitat preferences of oak-feeding xylophagous beetles in a temperate woodland: implications for forest history and management
TLDR
The high preference for sun-exposed wood located near the ground suggests that open-canopy woodlands had to be rather common in temperate Europe and oak-utilising xylophages would benefit from restoration of management practices such as coppicing or woodland pasture. Expand
Habitat requirements and conservation of Pytho kolwensis, a beetle species of old-growth boreal forest
TLDR
It is suggested that the host-tree and habitat requirements of an endangered saproxylic beetle species, Pytho kolwensis, is mainly restricted to spruce-mire forests because of the long-term continuous availability of suitable host trees in these habitats. Expand
Conifer introductions decrease richness and alter composition of litter-dwelling beetles (Coleoptera) in Carpathian oak forests
TLDR
It is suggested that maintaining the original overstory composition in managed forests, and setting aside forest reserves, can preserve litter-dwelling beetle communities typica lo f oak forests in the western Carpathians. Expand
Contribution to knowledge of two rare saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera) from Eastern Bohemia (Czech Republic) Příspěvek k poznání dvou vzácných saproxylických brouků z východních Čech
TLDR
Two mycetophagous species, which are rare in central Europe, are probably distributed only in landscape mosaic of people low-impact land use almost within continuous forest stands and are red-listed in many European countries. Expand
Does closure of traditionally managed open woodlands threaten epigeic invertebrates? Effects of coppicing and high deer densities
The demise of traditional woodland management techniques, such as coppicing or woodland pasture, is causing a gradual closure of formerly sparse lowland woods across Central Europe. It is establishedExpand
Fire and green-tree retention in conservation of red-listed and rare deadwood-dependent beetles in Finnish boreal forests.
TLDR
The results showed that the living conditions of many red-listed and rare saproxylic species could be improved significantly with rather simple alterations to forest management methods. Expand
The effect of forest clearcutting in Norway on the community of saproxylic beetles on aspen
TLDR
It is found that both sun exposure and substrate are important structuring factors for the community of saproxylic beetles and it is concluded that retention of trees when clear-cutting is an important means for safeguarding the fauna of sa proxylic beetles in aspen. Expand
Occurrence of rare and threatened insects living on decaying Populus tremula: a comparison between Finnish and Russian Karelia
Beetles and flat bugs living on the decaying wood of aspen (mainly under bark) were collected during expeditions to Finnish and Russian Karelia. Similar searching methods were used, and a comparableExpand
Substrate requirements of red-listed saproxylic invertebrates in Sweden
TLDR
To evaluate which qualities of dead wood have the highest conservational value for invertebrates, substrate requirements were recorded for all 542 saproxylic (wood-living) red-listed invertebrate species in Sweden to help decide how to optimize the conservation measures taken during forest operations. Expand
Cut high stumps of spruce, birch, aspen and oak as breeding substrates for saproxylic beetles
TLDR
It is concluded that many saproxylic beetle species adapted to natural disturbances can breed successfully in high stumps, and that stumps of different tree species address complementary spectra of the species pool. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...