Habitat fragmentation in forests affects relatedness and spatial genetic structure of a native rodent, Rattus lutreolus

@article{Stephens2013HabitatFI,
  title={Habitat fragmentation in forests affects relatedness and spatial genetic structure of a native rodent, Rattus lutreolus},
  author={Helen C. Stephens and Christina Schmuki and Christopher Paul Burridge and Julianne M O'Reilly-Wapstra},
  journal={Austral Ecology},
  year={2013},
  volume={38},
  pages={568-580}
}
Habitat fragmentation can have a range of negative demographic and genetic impacts on disturbed populations. Dispersal barriers can be created, reducing gene flow and increasing population differentiation and inbreeding in isolated habitat remnants. Aggregated retention is a form of forestry that retains patches of forests as isolated island or connected edge patches, with the aim of 'lifeboating' species and processes, retaining structural features and improving connectivity. Swamp rats… 
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