Habitat Split and the Global Decline of Amphibians

@article{Becker2007HabitatSA,
  title={Habitat Split and the Global Decline of Amphibians},
  author={C. Guilherme Becker and Carlos Roberto Fonseca and C{\'e}lio Fernando Baptista Haddad and R{\^o}mulo Fernandes Batista and Paulo In{\'a}cio Prado},
  journal={Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={318},
  pages={1775 - 1777}
}
The worldwide decline in amphibians has been attributed to several causes, especially habitat loss and disease. We identified a further factor, namely “habitat split”—defined as human-induced disconnection between habitats used by different life history stages of a species—which forces forest-associated amphibians with aquatic larvae to make risky breeding migrations between suitable aquatic and terrestrial habitats. In the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, we found that habitat split negatively… Expand
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