HYDROGEN GREENHOUSE PLANETS BEYOND THE HABITABLE ZONE

@article{Pierrehumbert2011HYDROGENGP,
  title={HYDROGEN GREENHOUSE PLANETS BEYOND THE HABITABLE ZONE},
  author={Raymond T Pierrehumbert and Eric Gaidos},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={734}
}
We show that collision-induced absorption allows molecular hydrogen to act as an incondensible greenhouse gas and that bars or tens of bars of primordial H2–He mixtures can maintain surface temperatures above the freezing point of water well beyond the “classical” habitable zone defined for CO2 greenhouse atmospheres. Using a onedimensional radiative–convective model, we find that 40 bars of pure H2 on a three Earth-mass planet can maintain a surface temperature of 280 K out to 1.5 AU from an… Expand

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