HY4 gene of A. thaliana encodes a protein with characteristics of a blue-light photoreceptor

@article{Ahmad1993HY4GO,
  title={HY4 gene of A. thaliana encodes a protein with characteristics of a blue-light photoreceptor},
  author={Margaret Ahmad and Anthony R. Cashmore},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1993},
  volume={366},
  pages={162-166}
}
SPECIFIC responses to blue light are found throughout the biological kingdom. These responses& mdash;which in higher plants include photo-tropism, inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, and stomatal opening1& mdash;are in many cases thought to be mediated by flavin-type photoreceptors2. But no such blue-light photoreceptor has yet been identified or isolated, although blue-light responses in plants were reported by Darwin over a century ago3, long before the discovery of the now relatively… 
The blue-light receptor cryptochrome 1 shows functional dependence on phytochrome A or phytochrome B in Arabidopsis thaliana.
TLDR
It was concluded that CRY1-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and anthocyanin production requires active phytochrome for full expression, and that this requirement can be supplied by low levels of either phyA or phyB.
Cryptochrome 1 Contributes to Blue-Light Sensing in Pea1
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Screening in a phyA null mutant background has identified several blue-light response mutants in pea, including one that carries a substitution of a highly conserved glycine residue in the N-terminal photolyase-homologous domain of the pea CRY1 gene.
Cryptochrome 1 controls tomato development in response to blue light.
TLDR
The tomato CRY1 gene (TCRY1) encodes a protein of 679 amino acids, which shows 78% identity and 88% similarity to Arabidopsis CRY2, and in order to verify the in vivo function of TCRY1, antisense tomato plants were constructed using the C-terminal portion of the gene.
An Arabidopsis Mutant Hypersensitive to Red and Far-Red Light Signals
TLDR
The results suggest that PSI2 specifically and negatively regulates both phyA and phyB phototransduction pathways.
The blue light receptor cryptochrome 1 can act independently of phytochrome A and B in Arabidopsis thaliana.
TLDR
Analysis of photocontrol of seed germination, inhibition of hypocotyl growth and anthocyanin accumulation clearly demonstrates that phyA shows a strong control in blue light responses especially at low fluence rates.
Blue-light photoreceptors in higher plants.
  • W. Briggs, E. Huala
  • Biology, Medicine
    Annual review of cell and developmental biology
  • 1999
TLDR
The carotenoid zeaxanthin may serve as the chromophore for a photoreceptor involved in blue-light-activated stomatal opening and some of the downstream events they are known to activate are discussed.
Blue-Light Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Cab1 Gene
TLDR
The steady-state level of Cab RNA in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana increases as a result of a single pulse of blue light, and Transcripts derived from the Cab1 (AB140; Lhcb1*3) member of the gene family are responsible in part for the blue-light-induced accumulation.
Cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors of Arabidopsis implicated in phototropism
TLDR
It is reported that mutant plants lacking both the CRY1 and theCRY2 blue-light photoreceptors are deficient in the phototropic response, and it is concluded that cryptochrome is one of thePhototropors mediating phototropism in plants.
Mutations in the NPH1 locus of Arabidopsis disrupt the perception of phototropic stimuli.
TLDR
It appears that the NPH1 protein is most likely a 120-kD plasma membrane-associated phosphoprotein because all of the nph1 mutations negatively affected the abundance of this protein, providing strong support for the hypothesis that more than one blue light photoreceptor is required for the normal growth and development of a seedling.
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