HOW MANY UNIVERSES DO THERE NEED TO BE

@article{Scott2006HOWMU,
  title={HOW MANY UNIVERSES DO THERE NEED TO BE},
  author={Douglas Scott and James P. Zibin},
  journal={International Journal of Modern Physics D},
  year={2006},
  volume={15},
  pages={2229-2233}
}
  • D. Scott, J. Zibin
  • Published 29 May 2006
  • Physics
  • International Journal of Modern Physics D
In the simplest cosmological models consistent with General Relativity, the total volume of the Universe is either finite or infinite, depending on whether or not the spatial curvature is positive. Current data suggest that the curvature is very close to flat, implying that one can place a lower limit on the total volume. In a Universe of finite age, the "particle horizon" defines the patch of the Universe which is observable to us. Based on today's best-fit cosmological parameters it is… 

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