HOW DO LEARNERS PERCEIVE INTERACTIONAL FEEDBACK

@inproceedings{Mackey2000HOWDL,
  title={HOW DO LEARNERS PERCEIVE INTERACTIONAL FEEDBACK},
  author={Alison Mackey and Susan M. Gass and Kim McDonough},
  year={2000}
}
Theoretical claims about the benefits of conversational interaction have been made by Gass (1997), Long (1996), Pica (1994), and others. The Interaction Hypothesis suggests that negotiated interaction can facilitate SLA and that one reason for this could be that, during interaction, learners may receive feedback on their utterances. An interesting issue, which has challenged interactional research, concerns how learners perceive feedback and whether their perceptions affect their subsequent L2… CONTINUE READING

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