• Corpus ID: 1312420

HOW BARLEY STRAW MAY WORK TO SUPPRESS ALGAL GROWTH

@inproceedings{Geiger2005HOWBS,
  title={HOW BARLEY STRAW MAY WORK TO SUPPRESS ALGAL GROWTH},
  author={Stan Geiger and Eric Charles Henry and Patrick E. Hayes},
  year={2005}
}
S OF LITERATURE ON BARLEY STRAW-ALGAE CONTROL Last Revised: November 1, 2005 Anhorn, Randall J. 2005. A study of the water quality of 145 Metropolitan area lakes. Metropolitan Council, Meares Park Center, 230 East Fifth Street, St. Paul, Minnesota. Publication Number 32-04-015. June 2005. The report reviews the results of monitoring 145 lakes in the vicinity of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota in 2004. Information is provided on the relative water quality condition of these lakes. Five of… 

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Filamentous algal control using barley straw

Year-round problems with dense growths of filamentous algae reduce the amenity and conservation value of Irish canals. Because algal control operations were relatively ineffective, trials using

Some effects of rotting straw on algae

A limited, but growing number of studies has been published over the recent years that support the evidence for algal growth inhibition by decomposing barley straw. In laboratory assays, GIBSON et

Barley straw as an inhibitor of algal growth I: studies in the Chesterfield Canal

TLDR
The presence of rotting barley straw in a dis used canal reduced the amount of filamentous algae and the technique shows promise as a long-term method of controlling algae.

Limited Effects of Barley Straw on Algae and Zooplankton in a Midwestern Pond

TLDR
No consistent degree of algal growth inhibition was observed for either algal type, and zooplankton community structure was not affected throughout this 14-week study (P < 0.10), which may be partly explained by inadequate levels of oxygen within the decomposing straw.

Effects of barley straw (Hordeum vulgare) on freshwater and brackish phytoplankton and cyanobacteria

TLDR
Results provide new records for theceptibility of freshwater and brackishphytoplankton taxa to barley strawexposure, including species-specificresponses and shifts in species dominance in mixed assemblages.

Towards understanding the nature of algal inhibitors from barley straw

The algal inhibitors released from barley straw decomposing in water and providing the basis for its use in algal control could be either of microbial origin or derived from straw components. We

The relative sensitivity of algae to decomposing barley straw

TLDR
Bioassays using Euglena gracilis suggest that the inhibitory compounds are not derived from the phototransformation of straw decomposition products and do not act primarily by inhibiting photosynthesis.

Long-term algal control in a reservoir using barley straw

Populations of cyanobacteria, diatoms and unicellular green algae in a potable supply reservoir have been suppressed continuously since 1993 by repeated treatments of barley straw. Algal cell numbers