HOUSEWIVES AND SERVANTS IN RURAL ENGLAND, 1440–1650: EVIDENCE OF WOMEN's WORK FROM PROBATE DOCUMENTS1

@article{Whittle2005HOUSEWIVESAS,
  title={HOUSEWIVES AND SERVANTS IN RURAL ENGLAND, 1440–1650: EVIDENCE OF WOMEN's WORK FROM PROBATE DOCUMENTS1},
  author={Jane Whittle},
  journal={Transactions of the Royal Historical Society},
  year={2005},
  volume={15},
  pages={51 - 74}
}
  • J. Whittle
  • Published 1 December 2005
  • Political Science
  • Transactions of the Royal Historical Society
Abstract This essay examines the work patterns of housewives and female servants in rural England between the mid-fifteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries. Despite the fact that such women expended the majority of female work-hours in the rural economy, their activities remain a neglected topic. Here probate documents, wills, inventories and probate accounts are used alongside other types of sources to provide insight into women's work. The three parts of the essay examine the proportion of… Expand
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