HOST-HOST communication protocol in the ARPA network

@inproceedings{Carr1970HOSTHOSTCP,
  title={HOST-HOST communication protocol in the ARPA network},
  author={C. Stephen Carr and Stephen D. Crocker and Vinton G. Cerf},
  booktitle={AFIPS '70 (Spring)},
  year={1970}
}
The Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) Computer Network (hereafter referred to as the "ARPA network") is one of the most ambitious computer networks attempted to date. The types of machines and operating systems involved in the network vary widely. For example, the computers at the first four sites are an XDS 940 (Stanford Research Institute), an IBM 360/75 (University of California, Santa Barbara), an XDS SIGMA-7 (University of California, Los Angeles), and a DEC PDP-10 (University of… 
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    AFIPS National Computer Conference
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References

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The interface message processor for the ARPA computer network
TLDR
The ARPA Network will initially interconnect many dissimilar computers at ten ARPA-supported research centers with 50-kilobit common-carrier circuits, but the network may be extended to include many other locations and circuits of higher bandwidth.
An interactive network of time-sharing computers
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The design and implementation of an experimental interactive time-sharing network of computers created as a joint effort by Carnegie-Mellon University, Princeton University and the Research Division of IBM are described.
RUTLEDGE et al An interactive network of time-sharing computers Proceedings of the 24th National Conference Association for Computing Machinery
  • 1969