HIV prevalence among foreign- and US-born clients of public STD clinics.

@article{Harawa2002HIVPA,
  title={HIV prevalence among foreign- and US-born clients of public STD clinics.},
  author={Nina T Harawa and Trista Bingham and Susan D. Cochran and Sander Greenland and William E. Cunningham},
  journal={American journal of public health},
  year={2002},
  volume={92 12},
  pages={
          1958-63
        }
}
OBJECTIVES We examined differences in HIV seroprevalence and the likely timing of HIV infection by birth region. METHODS We analyzed unlinked HIV antibody data on 61 120 specimens from 7 public health centers in Los Angeles County from 1993 to 1999. RESULTS Most (87%) immigrant clients were Central American/Mexican-born. HIV prevalence was similar for US- and foreign-born clients (1.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.7%, 1.9%] and 1.6% [95% CI = 1.5%, 1.8%], respectively). Seroprevalence… CONTINUE READING

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