HIV and Metabolic, Body, and Bone Disorders: What We Know From Low- and Middle-Income Countries

@article{Ali2014HIVAM,
  title={HIV and Metabolic, Body, and Bone Disorders: What We Know From Low- and Middle-Income Countries},
  author={Mohammed K. Ali and Matthew J Magee and Joel A Dave and Ighovwhera Ofotokun and Marisa Tungsiripat and Trammell K Jones and Naomi S Levitt and David Rimland and Wendy S Armstrong},
  journal={JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes},
  year={2014},
  volume={67},
  pages={S27–S39}
}
Abstract:Globally, the HIV epidemic is evolving. Life expectancy for HIV-infected individuals has been extended because of more effective and more widely available antiretroviral therapy. As a result, chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become important comorbid conditions. In particular, HIV-infected persons are increasingly at risk of developing metabolic (diabetes, dyslipidemias), body composition (lipodystrophy, overweight/obesity) and bone mineral density abnormalities. We have… 

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HIV-infected patients should be considered at high risk for alterations of glucose metabolism, including insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and diabetes, especially after initiating ART, and treatment remains similar to the general population.

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