HERESY AND FORFEITURE IN MARIAN ENGLAND*

@article{Cavill2013HERESYAF,
  title={HERESY AND FORFEITURE IN MARIAN ENGLAND*},
  author={Paul Cavill},
  journal={The Historical Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={56},
  pages={879 - 907}
}
  • P. Cavill
  • Published 30 October 2013
  • History
  • The Historical Journal
ABSTRACT The work of the martyrologist John Foxe ensures that the burnings dominate modern accounts of the campaign waged again Protestantism in the reign of Mary I (1553–8). Drawing on other sources, this article examines forfeiture of property, a less noticed but more common penalty imposed upon Protestants. It describes the types of forfeiture that occurred and analyses their legal basis; it considers the impact of the penalty and highlights means of evasion. By examining forfeiture, the… 
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