HEPATITIS C IN PREGNANCY

@article{Hunt1997HEPATITISCI,
  title={HEPATITIS C IN PREGNANCY},
  author={C M Hunt and Kelly L. Carson and Ala I. Sharara},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={1997},
  volume={89},
  pages={883–890}
}
Objective To review the epidemiology and clinical course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, to examine current data on the vertical transmission of HCV to neonates, and to develop recommendations for intrapartum and postpartum follow-up of neonates born to HCV-infected mothers. Data Sources The English-language medical literature from 1988 to 1996 was reviewed through MEDLINE. Methods of Study Selection Case series evaluating vertical transmission of HCV infection in neonates, determined by… Expand
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TLDR
The transmission of HCV from infected mothers to their babies by analyzing HCV RNA in the blood was investigated, finding three of the 54 babies born to these mothers (5.6 percent) became positive forHCV RNA during the follow-up period. Expand
Transmission of hepatitis C virus from mothers to infants: its frequency and risk factors revisited.
TLDR
A prospective study to discover the rate of HCV infection in babies born to mothers who were HCV RNA-positive but had no evidence for hepatitis, and only 2 (2.3%) of 87 such babies became infected during follow-up, suggesting low frequency ofHCV infection during the period from birth to this age. Expand
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TLDR
Mother-to-infant transmission of HCV infection from chronically infected women without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection seems to be uncommon. Expand
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TLDR
Serologic reactivity to HCV-encoded antigens in samples from infected children was largely confined to the HCV core protein, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus in the mother was not a significant cofactor for mother-to-child transmission of HCV. Expand
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TLDR
The findings provide evidence of vertical transmission of HCV and suggest that perinatal infection may initiate a silent disease process or chronic carrier state. Expand
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We evaluated vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 37 pregnant women, 20 of whom also had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody. The HCV subtypes 1a and 3a were prevalent amongExpand
Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis C virus
TLDR
Routine HCV screening is not recommended in pregnant women because of a lack of evidence to suggest an increased risk of HCV transmission through breast feeding and drugs to treat established infections in mothers and infants. Expand
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TLDR
These studies indicate that HCV is transmitted sexually only infrequently, and long-term spouses who have been married to patients with HCV-related chronic liver disease for many decades are at increased risk for HCV infection. Expand
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TLDR
The results imply that high-titer maternal viremia and normal spontaneous delivery may allow more HCV to infect the neonate intrapartum, therefore establishing perinatal transmission. Expand
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