HCOP: The HGNC comparison of orthology predictions search tool

@article{Wright2005HCOPTH,
  title={HCOP: The HGNC comparison of orthology predictions search tool},
  author={Mathew W. Wright and Tina A. Eyre and Michael J. Lush and Sue Povey and Elspeth A. Bruford},
  journal={Mammalian Genome},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={827-828}
}
The HGNC Comparison of Orthology Predictions search tool, HCOP (http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/nomenclature/hcop.pl), enables users to compare predicted human and mouse orthologs for a specified gene, or set of genes, from either species according to the ortholog assertions from the Ensembl, HGNC, Homologene, Inparanoid, MGI and PhIGs databases. Users can assess the reliability of the prediction from the number of these different sources that identify a particular orthologous pair. HCOP… 
HCOP: a searchable database of human orthology predictions
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) Comparison of Orthology Predictions (HCOP) search tool combines the human, mouse, rat and chicken orthology assertions made by PhIGs, HomoloGene, Ensembl,
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