H2O at the Phoenix Landing Site

@article{Smith2009H2OAT,
  title={H2O at the Phoenix Landing Site},
  author={P. H. Smith and Leslie K. Tamppari and Raymond E. Arvidson and Deborah S. Bass and Diana L. Blaney and William V. Boynton and Allan I. Carswell and David C. Catling and Benton C. Clark and Thomas J. Duck and E. M. Dejong and David A. Fisher and W. Goetz and Haraldur P Gunnlaugsson and Michael H. Hecht and Victoria J. Hipkin and John H. Hoffman and S F Hviid and H. Uwe Keller and Samuel P. Kounaves and Carlos F. Lange and Mark T. Lemmon and Morten Bo Madsen and Wojciech J. Markiewicz and John Marshall and Christopher P. McKay and Michael Tyler Mellon and Doug W. Ming and Richard V. Morris and William Thomas Pike and Nilton De Oliveira Renno and Urs Staufer and Carol R. Stoker and Peter A. Taylor and James Whiteway and Aaron P. Zent},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={325},
  pages={58 - 61}
}
Phoenix Ascending The Phoenix mission landed on Mars in March 2008 with the goal of studying the ice-rich soil of the planet's northern arctic region. Phoenix included a robotic arm, with a camera attached to it, with the capacity to excavate through the soil to the ice layer beneath it, scoop up soil and water ice samples, and deliver them to a combination of other instruments—including a wet chemistry lab and a high-temperature oven combined with a mass spectrometer—for chemical and… 
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Results suggest that the soil at the Phoenix landing site must have suffered alteration through the action of liquid water in geologically the recent past, and revealed an alkaline environment in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.
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TLDR
The analysis of the data from the Phoenix mission revealed an alkaline environment, in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.
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Habitability of the Phoenix landing site
[1] The Phoenix mission's key objective was to search for a habitable zone. Mission results are used to evaluate habitability where Phoenix landed. A habitability probability (HI) is defined as the
Mineralogy of the Phoenix landing site from OMEGA observations and how that relates to in situ Phoenix measurements
Abstract We present an analysis comparing observations acquired by the Mars Express Observatoire pour la Mineralogie l’Eau, les Glaces et l’Activite (OMEGA) and Phoenix lander measurements. Analysis
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[1] Sulfur has been detected by X-ray spectroscopy in martian soils at the Viking, Pathfinder, Opportunity and Spirit landing sites. Sulfates have been identified by OMEGA and CRISM in Valles
Concentrated perchlorate at the Mars Phoenix landing site: Evidence for thin film liquid water on Mars
[1] NASA's Phoenix mission, which landed on the northern plains of Mars in 2008, returned evidence of the perchlorate anion distributed evenly throughout the soil column at the landing site. Here, we
Ground ice at the Phoenix Landing Site: Stability state and origin
[1] A primary objective of the Phoenix mission was to examine the characteristics of high latitude ground ice on Mars. We report observations of ground ice, its depth distribution and stability
Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm experiment
[1] The Mars Phoenix Lander was equipped with a 2.4 m Robotic Arm (RA) with an Icy Soil Acquisition Device capable of excavating trenches in soil deposits, grooming hard icy soil surfaces with a
Possible physical and thermodynamical evidence for liquid water at the Phoenix landing site
[1] The objective of the Phoenix mission is to determine if Mars' polar region can support life. Since liquid water is a basic ingredient for life, as we know it, an important goal of the mission is
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References

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Evidence for Calcium Carbonate at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site
TLDR
Results suggest that the soil at the Phoenix landing site must have suffered alteration through the action of liquid water in geologically the recent past, and an alkaline environment was revealed, in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.
Detection of Perchlorate and the Soluble Chemistry of Martian Soil at the Phoenix Lander Site
TLDR
Results suggest that the soil at the Phoenix landing site must have suffered alteration through the action of liquid water in geologically the recent past, and revealed an alkaline environment in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.
Mars Water-Ice Clouds and Precipitation
TLDR
The analysis of the data from the Phoenix mission revealed an alkaline environment, in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.
A historical search for habitable ice at the Phoenix landing site
Abstract A time-resolved energy balance model in the latitude range targeted by Phoenix, and extending back in time over the past 10 Ma, has been developed and used to predict the time-varying
Periglacial landforms at the Phoenix landing site and the northern plains of Mars
[1] We examine potentially periglacial landforms in Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images at the Phoenix landing site and compare them with
Mars Exploration Program 2007 Phoenix landing site selection and characteristics
[1] To ensure a successful touchdown and subsequent surface operations, the Mars Exploration Program 2007 Phoenix Lander must land within 65° to 72° north latitude, at an elevation less than −3.5 km.
A prelanding assessment of the ice table depth and ground ice characteristics in Martian permafrost at the Phoenix landing site
[1] We review multiple estimates of the ice table depth at potential Phoenix landing sites and consider the possible state and distribution of subsurface ice. A two-layer model of ice-rich material
NASA Mars 2007 Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm and Icy Soil Acquisition Device
[1] The primary purpose of the Mars 2007 Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm (RA) and associated Icy Soil Acquisition Device (ISAD) is to acquire samples of Martian dry and icy soil (DIS) by digging,
Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and Expected Science
[1] Phoenix, the first Mars Scout mission, capitalizes on the large NASA investments in the Mars Polar Lander and the Mars Surveyor 2001 missions. On 4 August 2007, Phoenix was launched to Mars from
Behavior of Carbon Dioxide and Other Volatiles on Mars
We have found that a rather simple thermal model of the Martian surface, in combination with current observations of the atmospheric composition, points strongly toward the conclusion that the polar
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