H1‐antihistamines for the treatment of anaphylaxis: Cochrane systematic review

@article{Sheikh2007H1antihistaminesFT,
  title={H1‐antihistamines for the treatment of anaphylaxis: Cochrane systematic review},
  author={A. Sheikh and V. ten Broek and S. G. Brown and F. E. Simons},
  journal={Allergy},
  year={2007},
  volume={62}
}
Background:  Anaphylaxis is an acute systemic allergic reaction, which can be life‐threatening. H1‐antihistamines are commonly used as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of anaphylaxis. We sought to assess the benefits and harm of H1‐antihistamines in the treatment of anaphylaxis. 
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