Gut–brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression

@article{Foster2013GutbrainAH,
  title={Gut–brain axis: how the microbiome influences anxiety and depression},
  author={Jane A. Foster and Karen A Neufeld},
  journal={Trends in Neurosciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={36},
  pages={305-312}
}
Within the first few days of life, humans are colonized by commensal intestinal microbiota. Here, we review recent findings showing that microbiota are important in normal healthy brain function. We also discuss the relation between stress and microbiota, and how alterations in microbiota influence stress-related behaviors. New studies show that bacteria, including commensal, probiotic, and pathogenic bacteria, in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can activate neural pathways and central nervous… Expand

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