Guns, Impulsive Angry Behavior, and Mental Disorders: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).

@article{Swanson2015GunsIA,
  title={Guns, Impulsive Angry Behavior, and Mental Disorders: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).},
  author={Jeffrey W. Swanson and Nancy A. Sampson and Maria V. Petukhova and Alan M Zaslavsky and Paul S. Appelbaum and Marvin S. Swartz and Ronald C. Kessler},
  journal={Behavioral sciences \& the law},
  year={2015},
  volume={33 2-3},
  pages={
          199-212
        }
}
Analyses from the National Comorbidity Study Replication provide the first nationally representative estimates of the co-occurrence of impulsive angry behavior and possessing or carrying a gun among adults with and without certain mental disorders and demographic characteristics. The study found that a large number of individuals in the United States self-report patterns of impulsive angry behavior and also possess firearms at home (8.9%) or carry guns outside the home (1.5%). These data… Expand
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