Guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus

@article{Neill2002GuidelinesFT,
  title={Guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus},
  author={S. Mc Neill and F. M. Tatnall and Neil H. Cox},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2002},
  volume={147}
}
Summary These guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus have been prepared for dermatologists on behalf of the British Association of Dermatologists. They present evidence‐based guidance for treatment, with identification of the strength of evidence available at the time of preparation of the guidelines, and a brief overview of epidemiological aspects, diagnosis and investigation. 

Topics from this paper

Pediatric Lichen Sclerosus: A Review of the Epidemiology and Treatment Options
TLDR
New developments available in the current literature on the epidemiology and management of LS for children for children are reviewed. Expand
Guidelines for the follow-up of women with vulvar lichen sclerosus in specialist clinics.
It is recommended that women with vulvar lichen sclerosus be followed in specialist clinics where difficulty exists with symptom control or where there is clinical evidence of localized skinExpand
Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus in the Elderly
TLDR
Treatment is important and the regimen most often includes topical corticosteroid ointments, and lifetime surveillance of the skin is imperative because of the increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma in patients with lichen sclerosus. Expand
The Role of Calcineurin Inhibitors in the Management of Lichen Sclerosus
  • P. Yesudian
  • Medicine
  • American journal of clinical dermatology
  • 2009
TLDR
Topical calcineurin inhibitors should be used with caution in lichen sclerosus, a potentially precancerous dermatosis, because of concerns about their malignant potential with long-term use. Expand
Long‐term management of vulval lichen sclerosus in adult women
TLDR
Although superpotent topical corticosteroid (TCS) is the validated gold standard treatment to induce remission, little data is available on how remission should be maintained. Expand
2013 European guideline for the management of balanoposthitis
TLDR
This guideline concentrates on a selected group of conditions and offers recommendations on the diagnostic tests and treatment regimens needed for the effective management of balanoposthitis. Expand
Paediatric vulval lichen sclerosus
TLDR
It is suggested that the assumption that the condition will resolve at puberty may be incorrect, and children with LS require long‐term management with topical corticosteroids, which remains the treatment of choice, as well as long-term follow up. Expand
Clinical parameters in male genital lichen sclerosus: a case series of 329 patients
TLDR
The dermatological aspects of male genital lichen sclerosus have not received much prominence in the literature and the pathogenesis has not been specifically studied although autoimmunity (as in women) and HPV infection have been mooted. Expand
A multi‐centre audit on genital Lichen sclerosus in the North West of England
  • G. Raj, H. Bell
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • 2014
TLDR
Guidelines for the management of genital Lichen sclerosus (LS) have recently been updated and are recommended for use in clinical practice. Expand
Angiomatous reaction Kaposi‐sarcoma‐like as a side effect of topical corticosteroid therapy in lichen sclerosus of the penis
Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition usually located in the anogenital area. Topical corticosteroid therapy is the first choice treatment which may arrest or delay theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 117 REFERENCES
Vulval lichen sclerosus: lack of correlation between duration of clinical symptoms and histological appearances
Background Histological criteria in lichen sclerosus have been correlated with disease duration. A progressive tendency for the inflammatory infiltrate to become more deeply placed and more sparseExpand
Treatment of lichen sclerosus with potassium para-aminobenzoate.
  • N. Penneys
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • 1984
In five patients with symptomatic lichen sclerosus, significant clinical improvement was obtained following the administration of potassium para-aminobenzoate. Improvement was characterized by aExpand
Histologic criteria for lichen sclerosus of the vulva.
  • J. Hewitt
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of reproductive medicine
  • 1986
TLDR
Both epidermal and dermal changes were noted, but only the dermal ones were unique to the disease, and a grading system was developed. Expand
The association of lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and autoimmune‐related disease in males
TLDR
Patients with lichen sclerosus et atrophicus had a significantly higher incidence of autoimmune‐related disorders than a control population and a higher occurrence of autoantibodies than would be expected in the normal male population. Expand
A study of clinical and aetiological factors and possible associations of lichen sclerosus in males
TLDR
The findings indicate that lichen sclerosus in males exists as a spectrum of disease, ranging from a mild form with white plaques and few symptoms to a severe form with inflammation, atrophy and scarring with possible urological consequences. Expand
An investigation into the incidence of auto‐immune disorders in patients with lichen sclerosus and atrophicus
Patients with lichen sclerosus and atrophicus have an increased incidence of organ specific antibodies, and these patients and their relatives have a significantly higher incidence of associatedExpand
The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva and lichen sclerosus: implications for management and follow up.
TLDR
There was poor correlation between clinical and histological findings when SCC arose on a background of LS, and the incidence of SCC in vulval LS showed the incidence to be 7%. Expand
Bullous lichen sclerosus et atrophicus: treatment by tangential excision.
TLDR
Tangential partial-thickness excision of diseased tissues resulted in an extended remission of bullous LSA and offers an encouraging surgical alternative to other therapeutic modalities. Expand
Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus. A common and distinctive cause of phimosis in boys.
TLDR
Scarring phimosis in boys must be considered to be one of the most common manifestations of lichen sclerosus et atrophicus. Expand
Cryosurgery in the treatment of lichen sclerosus et atrophicus of the vulva
TLDR
Patients with lichen sclerosus et atrophicus of the vulva treated by a nitrous oxide cryoprobe had severe itching which was relieved in the post‐operative period in 75% and for 3 years in 50%. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...