Guidelines for the management of adult lower respiratory tract infections--summary.

@article{Woodhead2011GuidelinesFT,
  title={Guidelines for the management of adult lower respiratory tract infections--summary.},
  author={Mark A. Woodhead and F. Blasi and Santiago Ewig and Javier Garau and G{\'e}rard Huchon and Margaretha Ieven and Ake Ortqvist and Tom Schaberg and Antoni Torres and G van der Heijden and Robert C. Read and Theo J Verheij},
  journal={Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases},
  year={2011},
  volume={17 Suppl 6},
  pages={
          1-24
        }
}
  • M. Woodhead, F. Blasi, +9 authors T. Verheij
  • Published 1 November 2011
  • Medicine
  • Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
This document is an update of Guidelines published in 2005 and now includes scientific publications through to May 2010. It provides evidence-based recommendations for the most common management questions occurring in routine clinical practice in the management of adult patients with LRTI. Topics include management outside hospital, management inside hospital (including community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), acute exacerbations of bronchiectasis) and… 
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Assessment of guidelines on early switch to oral antibiotics and early discharge from hospital may help to achieve a unified approach to managing CAP in an Australian respiratory medicine unit.
Guidelines for the management of adult lower respiratory tract infections
TLDR
The guidelines cover the breadth of adult community-acquired respiratory infection, including prevention (both vaccine- and nonvaccine-related), infections in the community and infections in those admitted to hospital, including pneumonia, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and exacerbation of bronchiectasis.
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The primary aims of this paper are 1) to summarize and evaluate published data that address care of patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and 2) to improve
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Therapy for patients with less severe AECB include older and less expensive broad-spectrum antibiotics, while newer agents are indicated for Patients with the most severe stage of A ECB.
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