Guidelines for the Management of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections

@article{Mermel2001GuidelinesFT,
  title={Guidelines for the Management of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections},
  author={Leonard A. Mermel and Barry M. Farr and Robert J. Sherertz and Issam I. Raad and Naomi P. O’grady and JoAnn S. Harris and Donald E. Craven},
  journal={Infection Control \&\#x0026; Hospital Epidemiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={22},
  pages={222 - 242}
}
  • L. Mermel, B. Farr, D. Craven
  • Published 1 April 2001
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
These guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American College of Critical Care Medicine (for the Society of Critical Care Medicine), and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America contain recommendations for the management of adults and children with, and diagnosis of infections related to, peripheral and nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), pulmonary artery catheters, tunneled central catheters, and implantable devices. The guidelines, written… 
Microorganisms responsible for intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection according to the catheter site*
TLDR
Empirical antifungal therapy would seem to be indicated in patients with suspected femoral catheter-related bloodstream infection.
Identification of central venous catheter-related infections in infants and children
  • A. Randolph, C. Brun-Buisson, D. Goldmann
  • Medicine, Biology
    Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • 2005
TLDR
For the purposes of enrolling patients with sepsis in clinical trials, only patients who meet criteria for definite catheter-related bloodstream infection should be categorized as having the catheter as the infection source.
Catheter-Related Infections , a Diagnostic Problem
  • Medicine, Biology
  • 2007
TLDR
In critically ill patients, catheter-related bloodstream infections are associated with increased mortality, length of stay in the ICU and extra costs, and therefore diagnosing CRBSI is still problematic.
Vascular Catheter-Associated Infections: A Microbiological and Therapeutic Update
TLDR
The preferred conservative method is the “Antibiotic-Lock technique” (ALT), based on the endoluminal application of antibacterials at extremely high concentrations in situ for a period of time long enough to ensure bactericidal activity.
Role of Arterial catheters as a source of Hospital related Bacteremia
TLDR
Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are common in intensive care units (ICUs) and in the medical patients and can be prevented by following CDC’s guidelines for the prevention of devicerelated infections.
Diagnosis and management of catheter‐related bloodstream infections due to Staphylococcus aureus
  • I. Gosbell
  • Medicine, Biology
    Internal medicine journal
  • 2005
TLDR
In febrile patients, the presence of an intravenous catheter should always prompt consideration of whether the line is the source, even if there is no exit site inflammation, and if catheter-related infection appears likely, the line should be removed if possible.
Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter–Related Infections
TLDR
Examples of evidence-based interventions that can reduce the risk for serious catheter-related infection are education and training, maximal sterile barrier precautions, and 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis.
Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.
TLDR
The recommended preventive strategies with the strongest supportive evidence are education and training of healthcare providers who insert and maintain catheters, and maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion, which can reduce the risk for serious catheter-related infection.
Prevention and Management of Long-Term Catheter Related Infections in Cancer Patients
TLDR
Differential time to positivity, whereby a nonquantitative blood culture drawn from the CVC that becomes positive at least 2 hr earlier than the peripheral blood culture, is a new method for the diagnosis of CRBSI without removing the catheter.
Catheter‐related bloodstream infections in hematology
Central venous catheters are essential in the management of many malignant disorders, but catheter‐related bloodstream infections (CR‐BSIs) are significant complications in terms of morbidity,
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 249 REFERENCES
Guidelines for the management of intravascular catheter-related infections.
TLDR
These guidelines address the issues related to the management of catheter-related bacteremia and associated complications and provide evidence-based recommendations for assessment of the quality and strength of the data.
Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular-Device–Related Infections
  • M. Pearson
  • Medicine
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • 1996
TLDR
This two-part document updates and replaces the previously published Centers for Disease Control's Guideline for Intravascular Infections and provides consensus recommendations of the HICPAC for the prevention and control of intravascular device-related infections.
Management of catheter-related infections in pediatric patients.
TLDR
It is suggested that catheter sepsis can be managed with appropriate antibiotics, and when continued use of Broviac catheter is desired, a trial of antibiotic therapy should be attempted before catheter removal.
Intravascular device-related infections in critically ill patients.
TLDR
Intravascular device-related infections (IVDRIs) are among the most common nosocomial infections in critically ill patients and can be treated with intravenous antibiotics without removing the device, but removal of the catheter is recommended.
The management of central intravenous catheter infections
TLDR
It is recommended that vancomycin and an aminoglycoside be the initial empiric therapy for suspected catheter-associated sepsis and Lack of defervescence or continued positive blood cultures for 2 to 4 days despite antibiotics are indications for catheter removal.
Diagnosis of catheter-related infections.
  • H. Geiss
  • Medicine
    Zentralblatt fur Bakteriologie : international journal of medical microbiology
  • 1995
Vascular catheter-associated fungemia in patients with cancer: analysis of 155 episodes.
  • J. Lecciones, J. Lee, T. Walsh
  • Medicine, Biology
    Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • 1992
TLDR
Virtually all cases of catheter-associated fungemia in patients with cancer are clinically significant and require prompt therapy with amphotericin B, a finding suggesting that intravascular catheters should be removed in fungemia.
Impact of central venous catheter removal on the recurrence of catheter-related coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia.
TLDR
Although patients with catheter-related coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia could be treated successfully while the catheter remains in place with the majority remaining free of recurrence, catheter retention results in a significantly higher risk for the recurrence of the bacterenmia.
Nosocomial blood-borne infection secondary to intravascular devices.
...
...