Guidelines for empirically assessing the fairness of a lineup

@article{Wells1979GuidelinesFE,
  title={Guidelines for empirically assessing the fairness of a lineup},
  author={Gary L Wells and Michael R. Leippe and Thomas M. Ostrom},
  journal={Law and Human Behavior},
  year={1979},
  volume={3},
  pages={285-293}
}
Issues regarding the fairness of lineups used for criminal identification are discussed in the context of a distinction between nominal size and functional size. Nominal size (the number of persons in the lineup) is less important for determining the fairness of a lineup than is functional size (the number of lineup members resembling the criminal). Functional size decreases to the extent that the nonsuspect members of the lineup are easily ruled out as not being suspected by the police. The… Expand

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