Guidelines for antiemetic treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: past, present, and future recommendations.

@article{Jordan2007GuidelinesFA,
  title={Guidelines for antiemetic treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: past, present, and future recommendations.},
  author={Karin Jordan and Christoph Sippel and Hans Joachim Schmoll},
  journal={The oncologist},
  year={2007},
  volume={12 9},
  pages={
          1143-50
        }
}
Clinicians should be aware that chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still one of the most feared side effects of chemotherapy. With the correct use of antiemetics, CINV can be prevented in almost 70% to up to 80% of patients. Treatment guidelines are useful tools that enable physicians to integrate the latest clinical research into their practices. The large volume of rapidly evolving clinical data has been summarized and incorporated into treatment recommendations by well-known… 

Tables from this paper

Antiemetics: an update and the MASCC guidelines applied in clinical practice
  • J. Herrstedt
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Nature Clinical Practice Oncology
  • 2008
TLDR
A large number of trials have fine-tuned antiemetic therapy and made evidence-based recommendations possible for the majority of patients receiving chemotherapy, and recommendations from the evidence- based guidelines developed by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer are summarized.
A retrospective review of treatment patterns of antiemetic agents for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
TLDR
Adherence to treatment recommendations and antiemetics prescribing for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting was suboptimal at this hospital, however, institutional antiemetic guidelines and oncology pharmacists could play an important role in better assessment and management of chemotherapy- induced nausea and vomit.
Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Cancer Patients.
TLDR
Current understanding of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and the status of pharmacological interventions for their prevention and treatment are focused on.
Management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
TLDR
Every child receiving treatment for cancer should be evaluated for possible CINV, and their treatment should take into account the emetogenic potential of the chemotherapeutic drugs.
Adherence to antiemetic guidelines and control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in a large hospital
TLDR
Low adherence with both local and international recommendations for antiemetic prescriptions is confirmed, however, it could not prove that adherence involves a CINV reduction.
Evluation of Preventing Regimens Used for Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting
TLDR
It is demonstrated that in most cases the NCCN guidelines for control of CINV were not implemented and high cost of drug supply is believed to be a major cause of non-compliance with aprepitant.
Chemotherapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting
TLDR
Current gold standards of anti-emetics and treatment guidelines are summarized, as well as introducing innovations such as approaches to breakthrough and refractory nausea and vomiting, alternative therapies, and transdermal delivery systems.
Efficacy and cost: avoiding undertreatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
TLDR
The evidence for the cost of inadequately treated CINV, as well as current clinical guidelines for management of this symptom, are reviewed.
Evaluation of anti-emetic use in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a third-world country (Lebanon).
TLDR
This study reflected substantial flaws in CINV prophylaxis practice in Lebanon which should alert health care professionals of the adverse consequences resulting from non-adherence to guidelines.
Evaluation of Adherence to Antiemetic Treatment Guidelines in Patients With Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Teaching Hospitals in Tehran
TLDR
Low level of adherence of antiemetic prescribing patterns with international guidelines is confirmed, however, it could not be proved that high levels of adherence with the guidelines result in reduction of CINV incidence.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Recommendations for the use of antiemetics: evidence-based, clinical practice guidelines. American Society of Clinical Oncology.
  • R. Gralla, D. Osoba, D. Pfister
  • Medicine
    Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 1999
TLDR
Goals related to the complete control of emesis, ie, no vomiting, include providing care that is convenient for the patient, treatment that reduces hospitalization and time in the ambulatory setting, and therapy that enhances the patient’s quality of life.
Antiemetic activity of corticosteroids in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy: dosing, efficacy, and tolerability analysis.
  • S. Grunberg
  • Medicine
    Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • 2007
TLDR
With the increasing number of antineoplastic regimens and factors specific to individual patients, it is important to frequently review antiemetic treatment options and continually monitor therapeutic progress to establish the optimal therapy for each patient.
Prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced emesis: results of the 2004 Perugia International Antiemetic Consensus Conference.
TLDR
Recommendations about antiemetic prophylaxis in patients receiving treatment with chemo- and radiotherapy have been updated by representatives of nine oncological organizations.
Comparative activity of antiemetic drugs.
Prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced emesis: results of Perugia Consensus Conference. Antiemetic Subcommittee of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC).
  • A. Stewart
  • Medicine
    Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • 1998
TLDR
The best treatment for anticipatory emesis is the best possible control of acute and delayed emesis, and 5-HT3 antagonists have some efficacy in the prevention of acute emesis induced by high-dose chemotherapy but more studies should be carried out to determine the best preventive treatment.
Nausea and emesis: still an unsolved problem in cancer patients?
TLDR
A review of the situation with delayed chemotherapyinduced emesis and the role of adrenal hormones and an investigation showing that delayed cisplatin-induced nausea is augmented by high levels of endogenous noradrenaline are discussed.
American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline for antiemetics in oncology: update 2006.
  • M. Kris, P. Hesketh, S. Grunberg
  • Medicine, Biology
    Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 2006
TLDR
The Update Committee no longer recommends the combination of a 5-HT3 serotonin receptor antagonist and dexamethasone for the prevention of delayed emesis after chemotherapeutic agents of high emetic risk.
Efficacy and tolerability of aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with breast cancer after moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.
TLDR
The aprepitant regimen was more effective than the control regimen for prevention of CINV in patients receiving both an anthracycline and cyclophosphamide, and both treatments were generally well tolerated.
Antiemetic Efficacy of an Oral Suspension of Granisetron plus Dexamethasone and Influence of Quality of Life on Risk for Nausea and Vomiting
TLDR
Once-daily oral administration of a suspension of granisetron/dexamethasone is an active prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting and compares favorably with data reported on intravenous administration.
Delayed emesis: incidence, pattern, prognostic factors and optimal treatment
TLDR
All patients submitted to moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, carboplatin, doxorubicin and epirubic in, should also receive antiemetic prophylaxis with oral dexamethasone to prevent delayed emesis.
...
1
2
3
4
...