Guidelines and best practices for appropriate use of dalfampridine in managed care populations.

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex chronic, progressing disease that contributes to poor quality of life (QOL) for patients and high costs for managed care organizations. Currently, disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) constitute the platform pharmacotherapy for MS patients. Despite their efficacy, for many patients taking DMTs there is little evidence of their effect on QOL in general or symptom management. Impaired mobility contributes to direct and indirect costs. Annual direct medical costs for MS with gait impairment average nearly $21,000 per patient. Decreased mobility is also associated with higher absenteeism rates, thus raising indirect costs. Dalfampridine has been shown to improve walking in patients with MS. The effects of dalfampridine can complement those of DMTs by improving walking ability as a key component of overall mobility and a primary concern among many MS patients. Improved walking could potentially help contain some of the direct and indirect costs associated with MS care.

Cite this paper

@article{Miravalle2011GuidelinesAB, title={Guidelines and best practices for appropriate use of dalfampridine in managed care populations.}, author={Augusto A. Miravalle}, journal={The American journal of managed care}, year={2011}, volume={17 Suppl 5 Improving}, pages={S154-60} }