Guidance for Effective Discipline

@article{Wolraich1998GuidanceFE,
  title={Guidance for Effective Discipline},
  author={Mark L. Wolraich and Javier Aceves and Heidi M. Feldman and Joseph F. Hagan and Barbara Jo Howard and Anthony J. Richtsmeier and Deborah Tolchin and Hyman C. Tolmas and Floyd Daniel Armstrong and David Ray DeMaso and William J. Mahoney and P A Gilbertson and George J. Cohen},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={1998},
  volume={101},
  pages={723 - 728}
}
When advising families about discipline strategies, pediatricians should use a comprehensive approach that includes consideration of the parent–child relationship, reinforcement of desired behaviors, and consequences for negative behaviors. Corporal punishment is of limited effectiveness and has potentially deleterious side effects. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents be encouraged and assisted in the development of methods other than spanking for managing undesired… Expand
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