Guglielmo’s Secret: The Enigma of the First Diving Bell Used in Underwater Archaeology

@article{Eliav2015GuglielmosST,
  title={Guglielmo’s Secret: The Enigma of the First Diving Bell Used in Underwater Archaeology},
  author={Joseph Eliav},
  journal={The International Journal for the History of Engineering & Technology},
  year={2015},
  volume={85},
  pages={60 - 69}
}
  • Joseph Eliav
  • Published 2015
  • Engineering
  • The International Journal for the History of Engineering & Technology
  • Abstract The earliest employment of a breathing apparatus in underwater archaeology took place in July 1535, when Guglielmo de Lorena and Francesco de Marchi explored a Roman vessel sunk in Lake Nemi near Rome using a one-person diving bell that Guglielmo had invented. Francesco’s book on military architecture contains first-hand documentation of the exploration and of the diving bell; however, the author refrained from describing the bell’s most intriguing feature, the air-supply mechanism… CONTINUE READING

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