Growth tradeoffs produce complex microbial communities on a single limiting resource

@article{Manhart2018GrowthTP,
  title={Growth tradeoffs produce complex microbial communities on a single limiting resource},
  author={Michael Thomas Manhart and Eugene I. Shakhnovich},
  journal={Nature Communications},
  year={2018},
  volume={9}
}
The relationship between the dynamics of a community and its constituent pairwise interactions is a fundamental problem in ecology. Higher-order ecological effects beyond pairwise interactions may be key to complex ecosystems, but mechanisms to produce these effects remain poorly understood. Here we model microbial growth and competition to show that higher-order effects can arise from variation in multiple microbial growth traits, such as lag times and growth rates, on a single limiting… 

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