Growth efficiency and temperature in scallops: a comparative analysis of species adapted to different temperatures

@article{Heilmayer2004GrowthEA,
  title={Growth efficiency and temperature in scallops: a comparative analysis of species adapted to different temperatures},
  author={O. Heilmayer and T. Brey and H. P{\"o}rtner},
  journal={Functional Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={18},
  pages={641-647}
}
Summary 1Data were collected on metabolic activity and growth in pectinid bivalves from published studies. The resulting database comprised three types of data sets: (i) synoptic data (13 populations, 7 species), where both individual growth performance and metabolism are known, (ii) ‘metabolism only’ data (82 populations, 13 species), and (iii) ‘growth only’ data (198 populations, 26 species). 2In pectinid bivalves belonging to different species and living under different environmental… Expand

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