Groupware: some issues and experiences

@article{Ellis1991GroupwareSI,
  title={Groupware: some issues and experiences},
  author={Clarence A. Ellis and Simon J. Gibbs and Gail L. Rein},
  journal={Commun. ACM},
  year={1991},
  volume={34},
  pages={39-58}
}
Groupware reflects a change in emphasis from using the computer to solve problems to using the computer to facilitate human interaction. This article describes categories and examples of groupware and discusses some underlying research and development issues. GROVE, a novel group editor, is explained in some detail as a salient groupware example 

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