Group Selection and Kin Selection

@article{Smith1964GroupSA,
  title={Group Selection and Kin Selection},
  author={J. Maynard Smith},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1964},
  volume={201},
  pages={1145-1147}
}
WYNNE-EDWARDS1,2 has argued persuasively for the importance of behaviour in regulating the density of animal populations, and has suggested that since such behaviour favours the survival of the group and not of the individual it must have evolved by a process of group selection. It is the purpose of this communication to consider how far this is likely to be true. 
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