Grounds for Trust: Essential Epistemic Opacity and Computational Reliabilism

@article{Durn2018GroundsFT,
  title={Grounds for Trust: Essential Epistemic Opacity and Computational Reliabilism},
  author={Juan Manuel Dur{\'a}n and Nico Formanek},
  journal={Minds and Machines},
  year={2018},
  volume={28},
  pages={645-666}
}
Several philosophical issues in connection with computer simulations rely on the assumption that results of simulations are trustworthy. Examples of these include the debate on the experimental role of computer simulations (Parker in Synthese 169(3):483–496, 2009; Morrison in Philos Stud 143(1):33–57, 2009), the nature of computer data (Barberousse and Vorms, in: Durán, Arnold (eds) Computer simulations and the changing face of scientific experimentation, Cambridge Scholars Publishing… 

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