Grooming and the value of social relationships in cooperatively breeding meerkats

@article{Kutsukake2010GroomingAT,
  title={Grooming and the value of social relationships in cooperatively breeding meerkats},
  author={N. Kutsukake and T. Clutton-Brock},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2010},
  volume={79},
  pages={271-279}
}
In social mammals, grooming is used not only for hygienic purposes; it also serves social functions. We examined the grooming patterns of dominant males in groups of cooperatively breeding meerkats, Suricata suricatta, to test the hypothesis that the distribution of grooming reflects the value of social relationships. Grooming between dominant individuals was the most commonly observed interaction. Grooming by the dominant male was less common when the dominant female was in oestrus. Grooming… Expand
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